The Young Engineer

M. Lowell Edwards Public History Project

The Young Engineer

Arne Solberg, Richard Farnsworth, and M. Lowell Edwards demonstrating a machine

Arne Solberg, Richard Farnsworth, and M. Lowell Edwards, 1961

In 1927, Edwards returned to Tillamook, Oregon.  He married Margaret Watt, and they established a home that included, as it would his entire life, a workshop.  As an inventor, Edwards was a tenacious problem-solver. Margaret observed that Edwards, when working on a challenging problem, would awaken at night with an insight or solution, and go immediately to his workshop to record and test his idea. In an interview with the Santa Ana Register in 1958, Edwards was asked why he preferred a home workshop to a sophisticated hospital or industrial laboratory. He simply replied, “Well, I guess inventors are a queer breed.” For Edwards, invention was more than generating ideas; he was a hands-on worker, whose skills in his shop were a critical adjunct that enabled him to build and refine his own prototypes.